Putting the "log" back in Blog

Tag: benchcrafted Roubo

A shout-out to Mr. Roubo, Moxon and Abraham: Finished Workbench

Posted on July 9th, by Andy Brownell in Around the shop, Gorilla Glue, Projects. 2 comments

Every so often, I get to build something that truly transforms my perspective as a woodworker. My latest project, the Benchcrafted split-top Roubo work bench was one of those projects.

Not that the project was technically difficult, although I was faced with a few challenges, including not reading a clearly called out warning on page one of the template instructions to check the scale of your printer. This project started with humble beginnings as a fallen maple tree, then took 2 1/2 years to dry, and another 3 months to complete. It cost me close to $2,000 between materials, clamps, hardware, and … Read More »


Exotic Roubo Leg Vise

Posted on June 13th, by Andy Brownell in Gorilla Glue, Projects. 1 Comment

Sure, the use of “exotic legs” in my title  is bound to get me indexed by Google for something totally different than workbenches, but everyone knows what the internet is really meant for. 😉

I’ve had some left over Niangon boards (a West African species used for timber framing and boat building) from a previous project that was well suited for a few of the non-structural elements of this bench build. Plus, I didn’t have the thick/wide boards necessary for the leg vise in Maple, hence the need to go digging in my “left-overs” pile. I also have built the Benchcrafted … Read More »

Wood Lamination Glue-Up Strategies

Posted on May 12th, by Andy Brownell in Gorilla Glue, Projects, Uncategorized. 1 Comment

For several reasons, laminations are almost a completely different type of glue-up when you compare them with all of the other joinery glue-up scenarios. First, the total surface coverage is significantly greater than a mortise and tenon, panel glue-up and even a case of dovetails. Covering a larger area with glue takes more time to apply evenly. With this additional time, you begin to eat into your open working time – or the time you have before things start to dry. Second, the greater volume of glue coverage tends to slip and slide around during clamp-up, making proper alignment tricky. … Read More »