Putting the "log" back in Blog

Category: marketing & promotion

How to Build a Stacked Lamination Sculpted Bench

Posted on February 4th, by Andy Brownell in marketing & promotion, Projects, Tools. No Comments

I recently finished up a how-to video on building this stacked lamination bench. I used my sponsor Arbortech Tool’s TURBOplane for the vast majority of the sculpting process. The tool attached easily to my Rigid angle grinder, with this being the fourth project I’ve made using this particular power carving attachment.

Editors note: This is also my first real attempt at filming a woodworking video on my own with my Nikon D5200. I also taught myself how to use Adobe Premiere Pro for video editing. I had no external lighting or microphone, so be kind. 🙂


Learning to Power Carve with Arbortech Tools

Posted on December 9th, by Andy Brownell in marketing & promotion, Projects, Tools. 3 comments

The following post is sponsored by Australia-based Arbortech, makers of power carving, sanding and cutting tools. The opinions and projects featured within this post are my own. So my opinion is that despite the general mess left behind with power carving any wood, these tools deliver on performance, quality, and learning curve—not to mention they open up a whole new world of sculpted furniture design. Read on if you are interested in discovering why.

It’s been almost a year since I began my sponsorship with Arbortech. In that year, I’ve learned a great deal about power carving as well as how to integrate … Read More »


Power Carved 1970’s-Era Abstract Sculpture

Posted on December 5th, by Andy Brownell in marketing & promotion, Projects. No Comments

The following post is sponsored by Australia-based Arbortech, makers of power carving, sanding and cutting tools. This is the first of a two-part series on power carving a 1970’s-era abstract sculpture. The opinions and projects featured within this post are my own.

The 1970’s Are Back!

Like most eras in history, the decade of my birth had some pretty horrendous interior decor including heavy shag, artificial wood panels, and clashing tropical patterns to name a few. There were however, some stylish carryovers from the midcentury design movement that had elements worth mentioning. This included the use of darker woods, contrasting curves and sharp angles, and the … Read More »